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Rick Scott, Governor
Florida Department of Corrections, Secretary Michael D. Crews

Florida Department of Corrections
Michael D. Crews, Secretary

Inmate Population

Number of Younger Inmates Declining as Number of Older Inmates Increases

There were 5,365 (7.5%) inmates in prison on June 30, 2001 who committed their crimes before they turned 18. Their average age on June 30, 2001 was 22.2 years. Of those 5,365 inmates, only 395 or 7.4% of them were still 17 or younger on June 30, 2001.
  • 6,172 of the current inmates (8.6%) are 50 or older. That compares with 7.9% a year ago.

  • The largest age group of inmates in prison on June 30, 2001 was ages 35 to 39 (17.3%), followed closely by ages 30 to 34 (16.8%) and ages 25 to 29 (16.1%).

  • The youngest person in state prison on June 30, 2001 was 14 years old and the oldest was 89 years old.

  • As you can see from the table, there were 395 inmates in prison on June 30, 2001 who were still 17 or younger. Most were 15 or 16 years old when they committed their offenses. A breakdown by age at offense:

Inmates 17 and Under on 6/30/01
Age at Offense Number Percent
13 16 4.0%
14 72 18.2%
15 132 33.4%
16 154 39.0%
17 21 5.3%
Total 395 100.0%


  • The chart below also shows that the number of inmates who are 17 or younger continues to decline, while the number of older inmates (ages 50 and over) in prison on June 30 of each year continues to climb.
Number of Younger Inmates Declining as Number of Older Inmates Increasing
17 or Younger fell from 669 in 1997 to 395 in 2001.  50 and Older increased from 4,176 in 1997 to 6,172 in 2001

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