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Rick Scott, Governor
Florida Department of Corrections, Secretary Michael D. Crews

Florida Department of Corrections
Timothy H. Cannon, Interim Secretary

Prisons

Escapes

Night time view of a prison courtyard through a fence.The Florida Department of Corrections houses more than 102,000 inmates and has not had an escape from the secure perimeter of one of its prisons since 2006. Our low escape rate can be attributed to a number of factors, including razor wire barriers and improved technology for perimeter fences; security hardened facility construction improvements; better training and supervision of officers and improved contraband control. If an escape does occur, we refine our system to eliminate the problem that contributed to the escape.

In the following charts, the majority of the escapes listed were of inmates either in a work release facility (96.4%) or a work camp or road prison. Work release inmates are still in the Department's custody, but they are near the end of their sentences, minimum custody and are working in our communities daily, returning back to the work release centers after work. If they return late without a verifiable reason, they are considered escapees and will be returned to prison to complete their sentences, or may be charged with escape, depending on the circumstances. The majority of those listed as escapes in the charts are from work release centers.

Escapes in the 1st Quarter: 2 from Work Camps or Road Prisons, 50 from Work Release or Contract Centers, and 0 from Correctional Institutions; 2nd Quarter: 2 from Work Camps or Road Prisons, 34 from Work Release or Contract Centers, and 1 from Correctional Institutions; 3rd Quarter: 0 from Work Camps or Road Prisons, 36 from Work Release or Contract Centers, and 1 from Correctional Institutions; 4th Quarter: 0 from Work Camps or Road Prisons, 41 from Work Release or Contract Centers, and 0 from Correctional Institutions;

Escapes have increased from 63 in 01-02 to 167 in 10-11.