Skip navigation.
Home | About Us | Contact Us
Rick Scott, Governor
Florida Department of Corrections, Secretary Michael D. Crews

Florida Department of Corrections
Michael D. Crews, Secretary

Taxpayer Money and Prevention of Domestic Violence

The following questions were developed to determine how Floridians feel about where their tax money goes, and whether or not they would agree to an increase in their taxes to help alleviate the problem of domestic violence.

Question 15

Percent

Do you think enough taxpayer money is spent on the:

Yes

No

Enforcement of domestic violence laws?

33.9%

66.1%

Prevention of domestic violence?

22.6%

77.4%

Treatment of domestic violence offenders?

22.0%

78.0%


Question 16

Percent

Would you agree to an increase in your taxes to:

Yes

No

Fund more counseling for victims?

83.1%

16.9%

Fund more shelters for abused women?

74.2%

25.8%

Fund more treatment programs for batterers?

68.0%

32.0%

Increase police enforcement of domestic violence laws?

66.7%

33.3%

Increase prison space for batterers?

60.8%

39.2%

The majority of Floridians believe that not enough taxpayer money is being spent on the enforcement, prevention or treatment of domestic violence. Overall, 8 of 10 Floridians would agree to an increase in taxes to fund more counseling for victims. Over 7 of 10 would agree to an increase in taxes to fund more shelters for abused women. Floridians believe that we do not spend enough taxpayer money on treatment of offenders (78.0%). Almost 7 in 10 (68.0%) would agree in an increase in taxes to fund more treatment programs for batterers.

Women are more likely to agree to an increase in taxes to fund shelters (77.9%) and increase counseling for victims (85.1%). Women are less likely to agree that enough money is being spent on the treatment of offenders (16.1%). Men were more likely to respond that enough money is already being spent on the enforcement of domestic violence laws (42.5%), prevention of domestic violence (30.7%) and treatment of offenders (30.7%).