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Rick Scott, Governor
Florida Department of Corrections, Secretary Michael D. Crews

Florida Department of Corrections
Michael D. Crews, Secretary

Four hands touching.

Inmate Programs

Inmate Release Assistance

  • The department is working with the Department of Children and Families (DCF) to provide information to offenders about assistance available to them upon release. The department also works to re-establish benefits offenders were receiving prior to their incarceration.

Community Work Squads

  • Inmate labor is used on department farms and gardens. Inmates also construct new correctional facilities and perform repairs and renovations to all other department facilities. Inmates prepare and serve all meals, maintain prison grounds, participate in the sanitation and recycling process, and work in PRIDE or Prison Industry Enhancement work programs.

  • Additionally DC provides inmate Community Work Squad labor to work for other governmental agencies such as the departments of Transportation, Juvenile Justice and Agricultural and Consumer Services.

IMPACT
(Inmates Providing Animal Care and Training)

Dogs like these are trained by inmates for use by law enforcement and to aid people with disabilities.
Dogs like these are trained by inmates for use by law enforcement and to aid people with disabilities.
  • Gainesville Work Camp in partnership with Southeastern Guide Dog Inc., provides training for puppies to assist people with sight impairments. The IMPACT Program entails conditioning guide dog puppies (Labrador Retrievers, Austrian Sheppards and Collies). The inmates under the guidance of a volunteer representative from Southeastern raise and train the puppies from age 9 weeks until they are 17 months of age.

  • At the end of the training the inmates earn a Veterinary Assistant Certificate with course work designed at the University of Florida. With the knowledge that the inmates acquire they are afforded an opportunity to re-enter society with an employable skill that they can use to become productive citizens.

  • In addition to the IMPACT Training, bloodhounds are trained at various institutions to assist law enforcement agencies with search and recovery missions. Last year, DC received 260 requests for such assistance.

Equine Training Program

  • Inmates in this program are taught to train horses through various verbal and non-verbal methods. The training stresses method of working with horses that are non-violent. The department’s equine training program is currently operated at Lowell and Marion Correctional institutions. This program is the result of a partnership with the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation. Our inmates learn to care for retired thoroughbreds that have sustained an injury or are not able to perform at their peak.

  • The program trains inmates to rehabilitate retired thoroughbred racehorses for use by the department and other law enforcement agencies or to be adopted by the public. Some horses will remain in retirement at the farm. Inmates trained in the equine program will be employable as stable attendants, groomers, or exercisers once they are released from prison.

Masonry Programs

Inmates work in mason program in various institutions throughout the state.
Inmates work in mason program in various institutions throughout the state.
  • The Department and the Florida Masonry Apprentice and Educational Foundation are working together in a referral pre-apprenticeship masonry program for offenders who have masonry job skills.

  • In this partnership, DC provides masonry training for inmates enrolled in the masonry vocational training programs at Baker CI, Brevard CI, Columbia CI, DeSoto CI, Hamilton CI, Indian River CI, Sumter CI, and Taylor CI. Our vocational staff members promote working relationships between institutional masonry programs and masonry organizations in Florida.

  • The partnership includes job placement assistance for released offenders who have been referred by the department through registration in the apprenticeship program. Working relationships developed between our agencies assist in the placement of affordable, skilled and efficient craftsmen in this highly competitive industry.


Public Works, Interagency Community Service, and Contracted Work Squads Fiscal Year 2005 - 06

County Inmate
Work Hours
Estimated Value of
Savings
Alachua 140,034 $1,980,081
Baker 62,548 $884,429
Bay 44,367 $627,349
Bradford 103,534 $1,463,971
Brevard 100,992 $1,428,027
Calhoun 107,069 $1,513,956
Charlotte 16,832 $238,004
Citrus 288 $4,072
Clay 69,465 $982,235
Collier 22,880 $323,523
Columbia 84,681 $1,197,389
Dade 120,725 $1,707,052
Desoto 69,571 $983,734
Dixie 110,143 $1,557,422
Escambia 23,956 $338,738
Flagler 51,086 $722,356
Franklin 151,414 $2,140,994
Gadsden 294,541 $4,164,810
Gilchrist 71,365 $1,009,101
Gulf 180,708 $2,555,211
Hamilton 117,235 $1,657,703
Hardee 30,915 $437,138
Hendry 9,553 $135,079
Hernando 123,060 $1,740,068
Highlands 27,680 $391,395
Hillsborough 31,408 $444,109
Holmes 67,572 $955,468
Indian River 7,791 $110,165
Jackson 202,401 $2,861,950
Jefferson 20,121 $284,511
Lafayette 75,716 $1,070,624
Lake 2,255 $31,886
Lee 18,656 $263,796
Leon 42,828 $605,588
Levy 173,242 $2,449,642
Liberty 135,485 $1,915,758
Madison 97,489 $1,378,494
Manatee 10,133 $143,281
Marion 50,990 $720,999
Martin 42,107 $595,393
Monroe 17,966 $254,039
Okaloosa 74,615 $1,055,056
Okeechobee 12,415 $175,548
Orange 27,854 $393,856
Osceola 544 $7,692
Palm Beach 78,280 $1,106,879
Pinellas 33,181 $469,179
Polk 50,509 $714,197
Putnam 66,264 $936,973
Santa Rosa 213,899 $3,024,532
Seminole 3,641 $51,484
St. Lucie 27,741 $392,258
Sumter 152,054 $2,150,044
Suwannee 44,217 $625,228
Taylor 58,324 $824,701
Union 103,251 $1,459,969
Volusia 81,419 $1,151,265
Wakulla 24,320 $343,885
Walton 95,125 $1,345,068
Washington 145,012 $2,050,470
Total 4,423,467 $62,547,823
Inmate work squads mow grass and perform other community services as part of  rehabilitation.
Inmate work squads mow grass and perform other community services as part of rehabilitation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Text Box: DC Community Work Squads performed over 4.3 million hours of work valued at more then $53 million.

 

 

 

 

Inmates work in the Ford automotive repair program to develop marketable skills to helpthem find gainful employment upon their release, helping reduce recidivism.
Inmates work in the Ford automotive repair program to develop marketable skills to help them find gainful employment upon their release, helping reduce recidivism.

*The value of work is determined by multiplying the hourly wage value of $14.14 times the hours worked. The hourly wage value of $14.14 is a benefited hourly wage value. The base hourly wage value is determined from the Florida Occupational Wages 2006 Edition prepared by the Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. Added to this base hourly wage value are benefits for social security, retirement, health, and basic life insurance.