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Rick Scott, Governor
Florida Department of Corrections, Secretary Michael D. Crews

Florida Department of Corrections
Michael D. Crews, Secretary

References for Florida Studies

F1 – Analysis of the Impact of Inmate Programs Upon Recidivism (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Research and Data Analysis, January 2001) 2.

F2 – Fact Sheet on Inmate Substance Abuse Programs (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Substance Abuse Programs, in-process).

F3 – Annual Report, Inmate Programs, FY 2004-05 (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Substance Abuse Programs, in-process) 43 and 58.

F4 – P. Lattimore, C. Krebs, W. Koetse, C. Lindquist, and A. Cowell, “Predicting the Effect of Substance Abuse Treatment on Probationer Recidivism,” Journal of Experimental Criminology 1, Research Triangle Institute International, Springer 2005) 159-189.

F5 – R. Linster, “Evaluation of Florida’s Residential Drug Treatment Program, Prison Diversion Program, Final Report,” (National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, 1999) 40.

F6 - Fact Sheet on Community Substance Abuse Programs (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Substance Abuse Programs, in-process).

F7 – Analysis of the Impact of Inmate Programs Upon Recidivism (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Research and Data Analysis, January 2001) 2.

F8 – Florida Department of Corrections Institutional Education Programs (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Program Services, Fall 2002).

F9 – Analysis of the Impact of Inmate Programs Upon Recidivism (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Research and Data Analysis, January 2001) 2.

F10 – Florida Department of Corrections Institutional Education Programs (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Program Services, Fall 2002).

In review, as shown in the comparison table, both the WSIPP meta-analysis and the Florida studies or analyses show reductions in recidivism rates for selected programs.

NOTE - In October 2006, WSIPP will publish the next step of their analysis which deals with program ‘return on investment’ (ROI).   A ROI study conducted in 1999 by Florida TaxWatch that included correctional education programs in FDOC showed an important ROI for each area of correctional education.  The return on investment (over 2 years) for each dollar spent in each respective area was:  $1.95 for Special Education students in Academic programs; $3.23 for non-Special Ed students in Academic and Vocational programs; and $3.20 for all students in correctional education programs combined.8

Footnotes

  1. Steve Aos, Marna Miller, and Elizabeth Drake, Evidence-Based Adult Corrections Programs: What Works and What Does Not (Olympia: Washington State Institute for Public Policy, 2006).

  2. Ibid., 12.

  3. Ibid., 12.

  4. Ibid., 4.

  5. Ibid., 4.

  6. Ibid., 10.

  7. Ibid., 10.

  8. Return on Investment for Correctional Education in Florida (Florida Department of Corrections, Bureau of Research and Data Analysis, June 1999).