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Rick Scott, Governor
Florida Department of Corrections, Secretary Michael D. Crews

Florida Department of Corrections
Michael D. Crews, Secretary

Executive Summary

Probation and Restitution Centers (PRCs) Phase I

Probation and Restitution Centers (PRCs) are highly structured community-based residential prison diversion programs.  The length of stay in the program is based on individual offender/resident needs and program design.  Offender/residents participate in group counseling and case management sessions.  The social learning environment provides offenders/residents with continuous peer support and challenges in daily living skills.  The major learning themes are criminal thinking patterns, life skills, budgeting, personal responsibility and accountability, and employment readiness or skills training.  Offender/residents prepare for re-entry into the work environment and transition into the community.  The program provides a sentencing alternative and a resource for supervised offenders who are experiencing difficulty complying with their conditions of supervision and meeting their court ordered financial obligations.  The program also provides transition assistance to recently released inmates.

The PRC program consists of two (2) phases.  Phase I, the Intensive Programming Component Phase (IPC) and Phase II, the Work Component Phase (WCP).  The total time in the PRC Program shall be based on the individual offender needs and shall not exceed twelve (12) months, unless otherwise stipulated by court order.  During the WCP offenders/residents will begin to make payments on their court-ordered financial obligations and pay a daily subsistence fee to the contractor.
Profiles of Probation & Restitution Centers
On June 30, 2011
Facility Status Number of Contracted Beds Funded
Jacksonville PRC – The Salvation Army Active 20
Pensacola PRC - Non-Secure Programs, Inc. Opened January 1, 2003 20
Orlando PRC - Westcare Florida, Inc. (Original Vendor)
Non-Secure Programs, Inc. (Current Vendor)
Opened January 1, 2003
Assignment June 20, 2003
50
Phoenix Houses Inc. July 1, 2010 40
TOTAL 130
Average Per Diem on June 30, 2011 $40.82

Workload

Table 3A: PRC Enrollment Data by Fiscal Year
  • In FY 2010-11, (403) different offenders participated in a PRC.
  • On June 30, 2011 there were 133 offenders enrolled in programming at one of the three (3) PRC locations.
Table 3B: FY 2010-11 PRC Enrollment Data by Facility
  • Non-Secure Programs, Inc./Orlando-PRC had the highest number of different offenders enrolled in FY 2009-10, (194).
  • On June 30, 2011, there were 133 offenders in the program.

Outcomes

Table 3C(a): PRC Outcomes for Offenders by Fiscal Year
  • This table shows outcomes based on a three (3) year follow-up after the offender first entered a program of this type. They are counted as successful if they completed at least one (1) program, regardless of the number of programs they participated in.
  • On average, PRCs had a (44.8%) success rate (successful exits divided by successful and unsuccessful exits) from FY 1998-99 to FY 2007-08.
  • Success rates have increased from (36.7%) in FY 2006-07 to (38.9%) in FY 2007-08.
  • The proportion of offenders whose final program outcome is an administrative exit has averaged (10.7%) from FY 1998-99 to FY 2007-08.
Table 3C(b): PRC Outcomes for Offenders by Fiscal Year
  • This table shows outcomes based on a two (2) year follow-up after the offender first entered a PRC. For FY 2008-09, the PRC program had a (28.1%) success rate (successful exits divided by successful and unsuccessful exits).
Table 3D: FY 2010-11 PRC Exit Data (Event-Based) by Facility
  • Reviewing the outcome of the offender’s experience in each program from which they exited, the success rate varies from (5.9%) for the Phoenix House PRC, to (34.9%) for Non-Secure Programs Inc. – Pensacola PRC.
  • On average, these programs had a (29.0%) success rate with offenders exiting their program during FY 2010-11.  Administrative exits averaged (11.9%) for the year.  As seen in the prior table, many of these administrative exits lead to subsequent enrollments in other programs.

Recommitments

Table 3E: FY 2008-09  (2-Year Follow-up), PRC Recommitment Data by Level of Participation
  • At two (2) years past program completion, recommitment rates for PRC program completers (20.6%) are lower than for program non-completers (62.3%).
  • Prison recommitments (new offense or technical) for program completers are less than half that for non-completers (14.7% vs. 54.5%).
  • There is a slightly lower rate of return to supervision (new offense or technical) for completers (5.9%) than non-completers (7.8%).
Table 3F: FY 2007-08  (3-Year Follow-up), PRC Recommitment Data by Level of Participation
  • For a three (3) year follow-up period, PRC program completers remain lower than non-completers in overall recommitments (33.8% vs. 65.9%).
  • The greatest differences are for recommitment to prison (new offense or technical) for completers (26.0%) and non-completers (58.9%).
  • There is a slightly higher rate of return to supervision (new offense or technical) for completers (7.8%) than non-completers (7.0%).